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CAPA 2001-04-Autumn

Switching Sessions

Pages: 19
Year: 2001
Dr. Ida Rolf Institute

Structural Integration: The journal of the Rolf Institute – Autumn 2001 – Vol 29 – Nº 04

Volume: 29

One way I think about the recipe is that it is a way of understanding how large anatomical segments relate to each other according to a Structural Integration view. This understanding includes a staging of sessions based on certain embedded relationships in the body, an alphabet of relationships which Ida saw, and which we cannot leave behind but can manipulate into different phrases. In other words, it is appropriate to do sessions out of order, and add sessions that are not part of the recipe, delete sessions, and not use the recipe altogether; but you should take this step only as long as you feel (relatively) comfortable writing your own “recipe” or strategy of sessions based on your understanding of the alphabet presented in the classic Ten Series.

Some people are able to do this rather effortlessly. Like artists, they intuitively grasp the principles and easily bend them to their needs. Some make this transition with more effort, using experience, guesses, and the intellectual understanding offered by others, e.g., the Principles of the work as elucidated by Maitland, et al.

If my client is about to have a Third Hour and I am thinking of changing course, I would ask myself when looking at her, does she have enough support in her structure to handle this new direction? Can she adapt to the changes I am about to introduce? Where does she lack continuity in her structure and is what I am thinking about doing going to add to that continuity or detract from it? Obviously, these are questions one can ask anytime. In fact, asking them starts to help make clear why the recipe is in the order it is.

When a client is about to have a Third Hour session, one is completing making the “sleeve” structures more continuous with each other and open so that the “core” work of later sessions has the room it needs to bring integration. As I understand it, what Ida observed is that without a lateral line it is hard for a person to hold length in the deeper anatomical relationships of the body – an issue of both support and adaptability. Hence, Third Hour before Fourth and the rest. Seventh Hour work comes where it comes in the recipe in part because the rest of the organism must be able to adapt to the large changes being made in the cranium and support the lift. Is your client ready for that? Obviously, one can work the territory of the Seventh Hour without the intent of the Seventh Hour.

Third Hours are classically great sessions for restoring a person’s vitality and strength after a sickness or challenge. In that line of thinking, a Seventh Hour is classically a more taxing session, with the advice of taking it easy – no heavy stimulation – after the session.

Of course, these are all rules of thumb, not principles of the work, and the opposite can be true, i.e., Third Hours can be taxing, Seventh Hours can be enlivening.[:de]One way I think about the recipe is that it is a way of understanding how large anatomical segments relate to each other according to a Structural Integration view. This understanding includes a staging of sessions based on certain embedded relationships in the body, an alphabet of relationships which Ida saw, and which we cannot leave behind but can manipulate into different phrases. In other words, it is appropriate to do sessions out of order, and add sessions that are not part of the recipe, delete sessions, and not use the recipe altogether; but you should take this step only as long as you feel (relatively) comfortable writing your own “recipe” or strategy of sessions based on your understanding of the alphabet presented in the classic Ten Series.

Some people are able to do this rather effortlessly. Like artists, they intuitively grasp the principles and easily bend them to their needs. Some make this transition with more effort, using experience, guesses, and the intellectual understanding offered by others, e.g., the Principles of the work as elucidated by Maitland, et al.

If my client is about to have a Third Hour and I am thinking of changing course, I would ask myself when looking at her, does she have enough support in her structure to handle this new direction? Can she adapt to the changes I am about to introduce? Where does she lack continuity in her structure and is what I am thinking about doing going to add to that continuity or detract from it? Obviously, these are questions one can ask anytime. In fact, asking them starts to help make clear why the recipe is in the order it is.

When a client is about to have a Third Hour session, one is completing making the “sleeve” structures more continuous with each other and open so that the “core” work of later sessions has the room it needs to bring integration. As I understand it, what Ida observed is that without a lateral line it is hard for a person to hold length in the deeper anatomical relationships of the body – an issue of both support and adaptability. Hence, Third Hour before Fourth and the rest. Seventh Hour work comes where it comes in the recipe in part because the rest of the organism must be able to adapt to the large changes being made in the cranium and support the lift. Is your client ready for that? Obviously, one can work the territory of the Seventh Hour without the intent of the Seventh Hour.

Third Hours are classically great sessions for restoring a person’s vitality and strength after a sickness or challenge. In that line of thinking, a Seventh Hour is classically a more taxing session, with the advice of taking it easy – no heavy stimulation – after the session.

Of course, these are all rules of thumb, not principles of the work, and the opposite can be true, i.e., Third Hours can be taxing, Seventh Hours can be enlivening.

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