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Another View of Third Party Payments

I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:de]I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:fr]I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:es]I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:ja]I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:it]I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:pb]I have written this as an addendum to Dia Lyn Weidner’s extensive letter to the membership regarding insurance payments (see: February Rolf Lines). My purpose is to pass on information I have collected over the years on the best way to get third party payments for Rolfing sessions.

The first part of this letter will cover some general guidelines I have found to be helpful when dealing with insurance companies. The second part is an outline of the format I use, and Part III details which words a health practitioner can use legally when assessing his/her client’s condition. (Note: this last section only covers the U.S.; if anyone has information on how to approach insurance companies in other parts of the world, please write to me.)

Part I

There are some essential guidelines I follow when dealing with insurance:

1. The client pays me directly and is in turn reimbursed by the insurance company.

2. I recommend that the client obtain a physician’s prescription. The prescription should read that the individual is to have the ten session series of Rolfing (Structural Integration Therapy).

I have found, however, that with clients who have been involved with an automobile accident (e.g., whiplash), the automobile insurance company has paid in full without a prescription.

3. I only use “Rolfing” and “Structural Integration Therapy” when billing. I do not feel comfortable calling Rolfing/ Structural Integration Therapy something other than it is. I decided to include the word “therapy” after many recommendations from physicians.

4. I use a standard format and always include an article on Rolfing for their files.

5. I never fill out the insurance form my client brings me. I ask them to fill out all their own information, including name, address, signature and claim #. Since most forms have places “physicians” are supposed to fill out, I leave it alone. Instead, I attach my own letter of assessment, using my office stationary. In addition, I ask the client to obtain the name of the insurance agent who has been assigned to his/her claim, and address the letter to that person. A claim is less apt to get lost if it is addressed to a particular person within the company.

6. I always photocopy anything I send to an insurance company. All too often, my carefully worded assessment gets lost, and I want to make certain that I do not contradict myself when assessing my client’s condition in future billings.

Part II

My format for writing to insurance companies has taken a few years to design. It is quite simple:

Mr. Huma Huma (agent)
Insurance Company
Address
Re: Name of client Claim#

Dear Mr. Huma Huma,

This letter is to inform you that (Name) has come to me on (Date) for a standard series of Rolfing sessions (Structural Integration Therapy).

I am enclosing the physician’s prescription for the Rolfing work.
I am also enclosing in this letter relevant information regarding my consultation and first Rolfing session with (Name) on (Date)

I. Client’s Complaints

II. Observations (with Movement Assessment)

III. Recommendations

Fee per session:

Date of first session:

Amount: (Paid In Full)

I am enclosing an article on Rolfing for your files. Please contact my office if additional information is required.

Sincerely,
Neal Powers

Under Client’s Complaints, I can use any accurate description that the client gives me, and use quotations to emphasize that the statements are my client’s and not mine.

For example:
“I have pain on the right side of my neck.”
“I have trouble sleeping.”
“My lower back hurts when I lift my arm.”
“My shoulders feel twisted.”
“I just lack energy.”

Under Observations, I use my own terminology. For example:

Breathing appears shallow.
Erector spinae muscle group of back appear shortened.
Scalene muscles on right side of neck are shortened.
Limited mobility of vertebrae T 5, 6, 7.
Pelvis rotated right to left. Shoulder girdle counter rotated over pelvis left to right.

Sometimes I will have a subsection entitled “Gait Analysis”; I use this subsection when I observe my clients walking. and make note of the usual patterns we Rolfers and Rolfing Movement Instructors look for. For example:

Client sways to the right when walking. Limited right arm mobility when walking. Client complains of “head feeling heavy “when she walks.

Under Recommendations, I obviously recommend the ten session series of Rolfing.

You can see that it takes some desk work to put together a letter to an insurance company. However, although I cringe when someone comes to me requesting insurance coverage, I know that if I continue and it helps at all to make insurance companies begin to recognize the effectiveness of Rolfing and Rolfing Movement, it is worth the effort.

To date, all the automobile insurance companies I have dealt with have reimbursed the Rolfing work. Late last year Standard Oil of California (SoCal) approved using Rolfing for a “stress related situation” for an employee. Although this case was first refused, it was later approved when my client appealed the decision to the Medical Review Board. Their approval was based on my client having a physician’s prescription for Rolfing.

There are times when an insurance company contacts me for additional information. They usually ask for my state license #. I tell them I am certified by the Rolf Institute in Boulder, Colorado and that the Rolf Institute will verify my certification to the company if needed. Since I do not have a state license #, I offer them my Social Security Number. This seems to suffice and they are quite happy to use it in their computer.

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-1.gif’>

<img src=’https://novo.pedroprado.com.br/imgs/1984/710-2.gif’>

Part III

This section was taken from an 82 page pamphlet titled,” Deregulating Doctoring,” written by Lori B. Andrews and published by People’s Medical Society. This booklet covers a lot of information on where professional, alternative and lay health care practitioners stand legally in terms of providing various forms of health care within the different states. Cost is $10.95. For copies of the booklet, write to:

People’s Medical Society
14 East Minor Street
Emmaus, PA 18049

I have included this section of the pamphlet to inform members of which terminology can be employed legally when assessing a client’s condition.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kindest regard,
Neal Powers[:]Another View of Third Party Payments

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