Dr. Ida Rolf Institute

Structural Integration ā€“ Vol. 42 ā€“ NĀŗ 1

Volume: 42

Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:de]Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:fr]Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:es]Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:ja]Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:it]Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:pb]Amy Iadarola: I was excited to hear about the service work you are doing. Can you tell us a bit about the organization and how you became involved?

John Barton: The organization is Caring Chiropractic, Inc. (CCI), formed in 2010 as an innovative 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Kalispell, Montana ? a thriving northwest Montana city with an innovative and integrative energy that is as big as the state itself. CCI is devoted to creating positive impact on the lives of special needs and low-income individuals who live throughout northwest Montana. CCI offers services such as chiropractic, RolfingĀ® Structural Integration (SI), and massage on a sliding-fee scale based on income.
I first learned about CCI when I ventured out of my Rolfing office on Main Street and into the immediate community in search of individuals who could benefit from Rolfing work but might not be able to afford it. I arrived at the doorstep of Dr. Lynda Purdy, the Executive Director of the clinic and Founder of CCI. Dr. Purdy met my interest in the clinic with enthusiasm and explained the business model and intention of the clinic. She said that ?there are less than one dozen nonprofit chiropractic clinics in the nation,? and CCI is the first among them to also offer physician services (services provided by MDs). Out of all of the data she cited, this was most interesting to me and piqued my interest in working with the clinic. Like so many other Rolfers, I often provide services to individuals who need help but are unable to pay for it. Outreach is highly valued within the Rolfing community and warmly welcomed it seems.

AI: Was anyone at CCI familiar with Rolfing SI?

JB: Rolfing SI wasn?t part of the initial equation at CCI, but over a few months and after numerous conversations and meetings, the viability of our approach was apparent and Rolfing SI was added to the menu of services available at the clinic. I demonstrated the power of what we do by working on the President of the CCI Board of Directors, who was experiencing debilitating back and hip pain. Through a combination of neural, articular, and then fascial mobilization strategies he experienced a reversal of the pain. The results of just one session demonstrated that the service we provide was an extremely powerful and potentially necessary component of what CCI wanted to offer.

AI: Can you describe your role at CCI and how the clinic has developed over time?

JB: My role in the organization has evolved as I was asked to also join the CCI board and serve in an organizational as well as operational context. CCI?s goal, as identified in its mission statement, is ?to assist families and individuals to experience a joyful and active life by achieving the highest possible level of health while taking the cost of care out of the equation.? Ideas of this caliber might be relatively easy to conceive, but the process of organizing a nonprofit can be challenging. Primary to any nonprofit or for-profit business is revenue and sustainability. For CCI, this comes in the form of program income and fundraising ? conventional fundraising in addition to writing and applying for grants from other organizations that have shown specific support in the medical and healthcare sectors. CCI is projecting $225,000 in total revenue (primarily from program services and grants) for 2014 with a conservative projected rate of growth of 20% annually over the next five years. The clinic currently serves 140 patients through its charitable programs. Additionally, it maintains contact with the more than 1300 individuals in its outreach database. Since its formation, CCI has distributed more than $64,000 in charitable healthcare to deserving individuals and families. We hope to grow this and to reach additional low-income children and families in our community. We are on track to expand our service roster to up to 400 individuals and families in the upcoming calendar years.

AI: Talk a bit about what happens when a new client comes in the door at CCI.

JB: The clinic operates by providing same-day care when needed, and patients are admitted into the clinic once the necessary paperwork is completed. The application process for services includes a simple financial disclosure (to validate the need for fee modification) that is screened for eligibility according to benchmarks in the current year ?s U.S. poverty guidelines schedule.
Additionally, CCI has created a comprehensive therapy services package for five individuals annually ? those who exhibit the greatest need. These individuals will hopefully receive the assistance they need to overcome a disability, find employment, and potentially relieve their need for government assistance. Once eligibility is determined, the client enters the practice with access to CCI?s program services. The first appointment, conducted by Dr. Purdy or other CCI staff, is approximately one hour to initiate the process, complete the application, and evaluate specific needs. Subsequent appointments are roughly ten to thirty minutes depending on the needs of each individual and may incorporate a combination of chiropractic, massage, and Rolfing services. For acute medical issues and treatments, patients might require two to three treatments on average. Visits for more chronic conditions can total up to sixteen treatments per patient on average. Our overall goal is to provide the treatments necessary to help patients achieve physical independence and to stair-step down the need for continued treatments.

AI: Tell us specifically about the Rolfing component. Do you work with all patients, or only some? Do you work at CCI?s venue or do they come to your office?

JB: Rolfing appointments are scheduled through CCI, and then sessions are provided at my office, which is close to CCI. Clients are seen by appointment only, with special consideration given for acute conditions. I always have at least one pro bono client in my practice, either from CCI or other sources. Because of my schedule, space can be limited. Because CCI is a chiropractic office, the orientation and process for admittance and follow-up is specific to its protocol. Again, it?s not unusual for Rolfers to provide pro bono work or to offer a sliding-fee scale for special needs and low-income clients. What I find unique about CCI is that it brings a Rolfer?s skill set to a larger program. Its great innovation is its integrative approach to service for this population.

AI: I?m impressed with the way this program has been developed. What does the future hold for CCI?

JB: CCI intends to extend its nonprofit brand and build a network of additional health clinics on a local, state, regional, and national level, making this type of outreach accessible to many others. CCI already has a national network of support through its associate MDs, DCs, and other healthcare professionals, some who are also on the board of directors and others who are extended stakeholders. The clinic in Kalispell is the home office that projects to open or acquire additional locations once benchmarks are achieved. These benchmarks are meant to demonstrate an operational level of sustainability that can then be duplicated in strategically targeted locations. The benchmarks are measured in terms of quality more than quantity. Growth would come through developing positive relationships with other facilities and practitioners committed to this integrated approach. There may be a financial incentive for Rolfing practitioners interested in supporting a nonprofit clinic of this type because services provided to nonprofits are tax-deductible in some states.

AI: If Rolfers are interested in keeping tabs on how CCI expands, is there a newsletter they can subscribe to? How can they express interest in participation as the program grows?

JB: We don?t have a newsletter, but we do provide News and Press Room links on the CCI web site (caringchiropractic. org). Our organization is evolving and expanding nationally to incorporate other clinics that want to be a part of CCI?s vision. Rolfers interested in learning how they can participate in CCI program services can contact me directly to find out more.

AI: Any closing comments on service and how this has impacted your life and work?

JB: I?m extremely biased when I consider the value of the service we bring to the planet. We develop our craft using the vast resources provided through the Rolf InstituteĀ® of Structural Integration?s educational and training programs. We are like micro CCIs; even better, we are CSIs or Caring Structural Integrators. The human body is far more elegant and sophisticated than any machine, but I like to draw the analogy of each individual?s body being like a handcrafted computer, an elegant machine, a Ferrari. We are Ferrari service providers in a world in desperate need of our services. It is also most important to recognize that when we operate, move, and breathe from the stillness of ?beginner?s mind,? we add value to the whole in a way that might not have been accessible otherwise. This is what makes our place in the grand scheme of things so holistic, synergistic, and integrative. As a community born out of the need for SI, harnessed by the power of gravity itself, we should not place an undue amount of importance on ?our own? skills as if they were something we possess. Rather, we should see them as something we have been given stewardship over so that we may recognize our relationship to those who seek what we offer. So often I find myself attempting to distinguish why I/we are different from other practitioners. The real issue isn?t in our differences but the seamless integration and aggregation of a community of practitioners who desire to help those less fortunate in the suffering that arises from the human condition.[:]Innovations in Caring

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