SHINNEMAN, Amy
URBANCZIK, Aleš
Don St. John
BAILEY, Greer
Lu Mueller-Kaul
SCHWIND, Peter
SKILLMAN, MaryAnn
WANG, Tina J.
MULLER-KAUL, Lu
CHAITOW, Leon
KINNUNEN, Jeffrey
MUELLER-KAUL, Lu
Pages: 39-44
Year 1998
Rolfing® Practitioners, practicing in a field with little experimental research and learning often by imitation and intuition, consistently look for links between our experience as practitioners and the established viewpoint of scientific knowledge. The following article, the keynote speech at 1997’s Annual Meeting, provides an interesting perspective on Rolfing’s relationship to the biological sciences. However, instead of “legitimizing” our experience of Rolfing by comparing it with traditional theories, it places the philosophy, science, and art of our profession in the context of recent inquiry about the nature of living organisms. Our experience of the unity of mind and body in our work with living beings finds a context in theories of cognition and the systems of life. We begin to see how Rolling can best be viewed, not by being explained by “science,” but as a vehicle for inquiry at the very edge of biological theory.
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